Tag Archives: #abandonedhospital

White hospital – Germany

White hospital – Germany
(Black_and_White & darktoned)
(2015)

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dubbelclick on the photo to enlarge it
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White Hospital - Germany-37
White Hospital - Germany-32 White Hospital - Germany-30
White Hospital - Germany-16 White Hospital - Germany-15
White Hospital - Germany-4
White Hospital - Germany-12 White Hospital - Germany-13
White Hospital - Germany-20 White Hospital - Germany-14
White Hospital - Germany-9
White Hospital - Germany-21 White Hospital - Germany-18
White Hospital - Germany-1
White Hospital - Germany-35
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Gartloch Hospital – Scotland

Gartloch Hospital – Scotland
(2012)

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On urbex-holiday with my cousin Jascha Hoste
Click on Photo to enlarge it
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Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-8 Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-5
Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-10 Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-9
Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-11 Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-1
Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-15 Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-18
Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-21 Gartloch Hospital - Scotland-23
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Zombie Hospital – Berlin – Germany (ver)

Zombie Hospital – Berlin – Germany
(2016)
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Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (64 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (71 van 19)
Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (73 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (72 van 19)
Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (62 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (63 van 19)
Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (67 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (58 van 19)
Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (70 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (60 van 19)
Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (69 van 19) Zombie hospital - V - Berlin - Germany  (76 van 19)
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Zombie Hospital_psychorooms – Germany

Zombie Hospital_psychorooms – Germany
(2016)
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The Kinderkrankenhaus’ story begins in March 1908, when it was decided to build Prussia’s first municipal children’s hospital to help combat rising infant mortality rates at the time.
Construction got underway in June 1909, overseen by the prominent architect Carl James Bühring. He built a load of stuff in Berlin and then later in Leipzig.
On July 8, 1911, the hospital was inaugurated amid great fanfare on what was then-called Kniprodeallee. It had a little park for therapeutic purposes and – best of all – milk production facilities, with a cowshed, dairy and everything needed for milk storage and transportation.
Not only was the hospital considered one of the best of its kind anywhere, but it hosted the Third International Congress for the Study and Prevention of Infant Mortality from September 9-15 that same year.
Of course, more buildings were added down the years, as can be discerned from their varying and contrasting styles, but the cows’ facilities were done away with in 1920. Well, they catered instead to the city.
Later, in 1965, they became part of a dairy farm in nearby Heinersdorf. I presume they weren’t using the same cows or the milk must have been fairly sour.
The hospital was again expanded with a new wing in October 1987, but the whole thing was cruelly shut down after 85½ years of service to Berlin’s newest arrivals on January 1, 1997.
It’s been lying idle ever since, punished repeatedly by weather and brainless zombies who insist on burning it. Bruised, battered and burnt, it pines for the days it used to welcome brand new little people into the world and care for bigger little people who suffered misfortunes.
But no, its lifeblood is denied and now the property speculator zombies are circling. It’s the hospital that ran out of patients.
info: http://www.abandonedberlin.com
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click on photo to enlarge
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Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (27 van 57)Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (55 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (56 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (49 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (51 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (57 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (50 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (54 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (48 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (53 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (5 van 57)
 Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (20 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (9 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany  (35 van 57)
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Zombie Hospiatl_H – Berlin – Germany

Zombie Hospital_H – Berlin – Germany
(2016)

The Kinderkrankenhaus’ story begins in March 1908, when it was decided to build Prussia’s first municipal children’s hospital to help combat rising infant mortality rates at the time.
Construction got underway in June 1909, overseen by the prominent architect Carl James Bühring. He built a load of stuff in Berlin and then later in Leipzig.
On July 8, 1911, the hospital was inaugurated amid great fanfare on what was then-called Kniprodeallee. It had a little park for therapeutic purposes and – best of all – milk production facilities, with a cowshed, dairy and everything needed for milk storage and transportation.
Not only was the hospital considered one of the best of its kind anywhere, but it hosted the Third International Congress for the Study and Prevention of Infant Mortality from September 9-15 that same year.
Of course, more buildings were added down the years, as can be discerned from their varying and contrasting styles, but the cows’ facilities were done away with in 1920. Well, they catered instead to the city.
Later, in 1965, they became part of a dairy farm in nearby Heinersdorf. I presume they weren’t using the same cows or the milk must have been fairly sour.
The hospital was again expanded with a new wing in October 1987, but the whole thing was cruelly shut down after 85½ years of service to Berlin’s newest arrivals on January 1, 1997.
It’s been lying idle ever since, punished repeatedly by weather and brainless zombies who insist on burning it. Bruised, battered and burnt, it pines for the days it used to welcome brand new little people into the world and care for bigger little people who suffered misfortunes.
But no, its lifeblood is denied and now the property speculator zombies are circling. It’s the hospital that ran out of patients.
info: http://www.abandonedberlin.com
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click on photo to enlarge
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Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (1 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (30 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (3 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (11 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (7 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (4 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (18 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (12 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (19 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (28 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (9 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (5 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (39 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (38 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (35 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (42 van 57)
Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (32 van 57) Zombie hospital - H - Berlin - Germany (44 van 57)

More soon on : http://peterhoste.nl/zombie-hospital_h-vertical-berlin-germany/
and http://peterhoste.nl/zombie-hospital_psychorooms-germany/
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Abandoned mental hospital – Sweden

Abandoned mental hospital – Sweden
(2012)
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Click on Photo to enlarge
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Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (2 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (65 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (42 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (46 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (47 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (44 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (17 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (56 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (52 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (48 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (15 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (13 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (41 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (6 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (59 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (24 van 65)
Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (21 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (57 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (20 van 65) Abandoned mental hospital - Sweden (9 van 65)
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Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital – Germany

Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital – Berlin – Germany
(2016)
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Queen Elisabeth of Prussia, originally from Bavaria until she married her way out of Munich. Her hospital was established on April 14, 1843, while she was still queen on account of her husband, Friedrich Wilhelm IV. The “Small-Sick-Children-Preservation-Institution,” as it was called, was based in Mitte at the time and didn’t move to the site we’re concerned with at Oberschöneweide until 1910. It moved to Kreuzberg before that, getting the slightly more palatable name of Elisabeth Children’s Hospital in 1844.
Once it moved to the 130-bed facility at Oberschöneweide (Karlshorster Straße at the time, now Treskowallee), a department for internal medicine and surgery for adults was created and it was renamed the Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (Queen Elisabeth Hospital) to reflect the new all-inclusive approach to patients.
An epidemic of scarlet fever in 1913 caused severe overcrowding and it was decided after that to reduce the hospital’s less busy kids’ department. hen the First World War broke out and a lot of its doctors and deaconesses were sent off to the fronts to look after patients at the source of their problems. A military hospital with 150 beds was set up alongside the 100-bed civil hospital in Oberschöneweide to cope with patients returned back from the front. If only they’d put the front at the back and met in the middle perhaps they could have avoided all the fighting. I suppose it’s too late to tell them now…
Things weren’t all that much better after the war, what with the depression and hyperinflation and all that. It was 1924 before the hospital could really get going again.
Just when things seemed to be looking up, however, Germany caught Naziitus. It seemed innocuous at first; no one believed the warnings, most were more concerned about preserving their own hides.

info from Abandoned Berlin http://www.abandonedberlin.com/2015/06/koenigin-elisabeth-hospital.html and more on info on the topic
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click on photo to enlarge
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Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (10 van 11)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (9 van 11) Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (12 van 4)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (4 van 11) Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (14 van 4)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (2 van 11) Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (5 van 11)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (8 van 11) Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (3 van 11)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (1 van 11) Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (15 van 4)Königin-Elisabeth-Hospital (11 van 11)
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Whittingham Asylum – United Kingdom

Whittingham Asylum – United Kingdom
(2012) (vertical)

Photo’s / images have always had my interest, from 2012 i spent more time in this fantastic hobby.
Summer 2012 i went with my cousin Jascha Hoste ( www.lostintime.eu.nl ) on an urbextrip through the UK, where we visited some wonderful locations,1 is..
(info from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittingham_Hospital )

Whittingham Hospital was a psychiatric hospital in the parish of Whittingham, near Preston, Lancashire, England. The hospital opened in 1873 as the Fourth Lancashire County Asylum and grew to be the largest mental hospital in Britain, and pioneered the use of electroencephalograms (EEGs). During its time it had its own church, farms, railway, telephone exchange, post office, reservoirs, gas works, brewery, orchestra, brass band, ballroom and butchers.[1] It closed in 1995.

IN THE EARLY YEARS, North Lodge, the entrance to Guild Park, the grounds of the former Whittingham Hospital
A ward exterior pictured in 2008

The hospital officially opened on 1 April 1873, although 115 patients had already been admitted in the previous year, some of whom helped with the building work.[6] The large complex (to be known as St. Luke’s Division from 1958) was completed in June 1875, and had an initial capacity of 1100 inmates and included an Anglican church, a Catholic chapel, a recreation hall and a large farm estate.[7]In 1878 a new annexe (known as St. John’s Division from 1958) was built on 68 acres of land to the north of the site. The annexe was completed in 1880 and could accommodate 700 patients and, by the special agreement of the Postmaster General, the hospital’s own dedicated Post Office.[8] The hospital contributed £15,500 towards Fulwood Urban District Council’s scheme to extract water from Beacon Fell, in exchange for 90,000 gallons of water per day to be supplied, free of charge, to the hospital. This was achieved under the Fulwood and Whittingham Water Act of 1882.[9] In 1884, a sanatorium was established in the grounds for patients with infectious diseases.[8]In 1892 works began for the grounds to be illuminated by electric lamps; these works were completed in 1894. In 1900 an annexe called Cameron House was opened to the northwest of the main building, joined in 1912 by a third annexe, later to become known as St Margaret’s division in 1958. By 1915 the number of inmates was recorded as 2,820 – more than double the asylum’s original capacity.[8]

More about the use of the hospital in the first,- second,- & postwar and about the Abuse scandal and enquiry july 1967 and much more on
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittingham_Hospital and for more horizontal photo’s: http://peterhoste.nl/whittingham-asylum-united-kingdom-h

Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (138 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (124 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (127 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (158 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (155 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (144 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (140 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (135 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (141 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (41 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (40 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (154 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (115 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (113 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (137 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (145 van 60)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (105 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (122 van 60)Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (104 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (128 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (120 van 60) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (152 van 60)

…meanwhile time brakes down the materials & memories of this place.
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Whittingham Asylum – United Kingdom

Whittingham Asylum – United Kingdom
(2012) (horizontal)

Photo’s / images have always had my interest, from 2012 i spent more time in this fantastic hobby.
Summer 2012 i went with my cousin Jascha Hoste ( www.lostintime.eu.nl ) on an urbextrip through the UK, where we visited some wonderful locations,1 is..
(info from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittingham_Hospital )

Whittingham Hospital was a psychiatric hospital in the parish of Whittingham, near Preston, Lancashire, England. The hospital opened in 1873 as the Fourth Lancashire County Asylum and grew to be the largest mental hospital in Britain, and pioneered the use of electroencephalograms (EEGs). During its time it had its own church, farms, railway, telephone exchange, post office, reservoirs, gas works, brewery, orchestra, brass band, ballroom and butchers.[1] It closed in 1995.

IN THE EARLY YEARS, North Lodge, the entrance to Guild Park, the grounds of the former Whittingham Hospital
A ward exterior pictured in 2008

The hospital officially opened on 1 April 1873, although 115 patients had already been admitted in the previous year, some of whom helped with the building work.[6] The large complex (to be known as St. Luke’s Division from 1958) was completed in June 1875, and had an initial capacity of 1100 inmates and included an Anglican church, a Catholic chapel, a recreation hall and a large farm estate.[7]In 1878 a new annexe (known as St. John’s Division from 1958) was built on 68 acres of land to the north of the site. The annexe was completed in 1880 and could accommodate 700 patients and, by the special agreement of the Postmaster General, the hospital’s own dedicated Post Office.[8] The hospital contributed £15,500 towards Fulwood Urban District Council’s scheme to extract water from Beacon Fell, in exchange for 90,000 gallons of water per day to be supplied, free of charge, to the hospital. This was achieved under the Fulwood and Whittingham Water Act of 1882.[9] In 1884, a sanatorium was established in the grounds for patients with infectious diseases.[8]In 1892 works began for the grounds to be illuminated by electric lamps; these works were completed in 1894. In 1900 an annexe called Cameron House was opened to the northwest of the main building, joined in 1912 by a third annexe, later to become known as St Margaret’s division in 1958. By 1915 the number of inmates was recorded as 2,820 – more than double the asylum’s original capacity.[8]

More about the use of the hospital in the first,- second,- & postwar and about the Abuse scandal and enquiry july 1967 and much more on
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittingham_Hospital and for more vertical photo’s: http://peterhoste.nl/whittingham-asylum-united-kingdom-v

Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (37 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (39 van 42)

Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (76 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (47 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (70 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (45 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (43 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (64 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (57 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (60 van 42)

Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (73 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (72 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (49 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (63 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (54 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (58 van 42)
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Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (78 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (77 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (55 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (46 van 42)
Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (38 van 42) Whittingham Asylum - United Kingdom (52 van 42)

….meanwhile time will break down the materials & memories of this place.
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Milbitz Heilstatten – Germany

Milbitz Heilstatten – Germany
(2014)

Click on photo to enlarge
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Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (21 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (20 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (22 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (24 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (29 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (13 van 29)  Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (12 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (4 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (27 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (14 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (25 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (18 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (19 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (6 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (15 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (28 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (10 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (9 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (7 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (8 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (11 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (5 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (16 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (17 van 29)Milbitz Heilstatten - Germany (6 van 29)—————————————————————————————————————–